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Where Can I Learn to Be a Phlebotomist?

    Training/Time Frame

    • According to DegreeDirectory.org, phlebotomist training programs typically last one or two semesters and are available at many community colleges and hospitals. Because you need to develop the skill to draw blood, you will need to participate in hands-on training, although some programs may include online learning as part of the program. Some states may also require additional licensing and registration.

    Alternatives

    • In addition to local training programs, more advanced training leading to a two- or four-year degree is also available. DegreeDirectory.org recommends programs from institutions such as DeVry University, Kaplan University and Walden University.

    Considerations

    • Some employers may also require certification. Certification can be obtained from organizations such as the American Society of Clinical Pathology or the American Certification Society of Clinical Pathologists (See Resources).

    Potential

    • According to Salary.com, phlebotomists earn on average between $23,343 and $35,223 as of 2010. The need for phlebotomists should continue to grow rapidly as the population continues to age and live longer lives.



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