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How a Cup Paint Spray Gun Works

    Non-Bleeder Cup Sprayers

    • A non-bleeder paint gun has no air flow until the user pulls the trigger. When the trigger is pulled, the paint port opens to allow paint flow, and the air port opens simultaneously to create the air pressure to blow the paint. These guns completely turn off the flow of air when the trigger is off.

    Bleeder Cup Sprayers

    • Bleeder sprayers always have a flow of air that is constantly on, even if the trigger is not pulled. Although some people do not like the air pressure constantly running, the advantage to bleeder systems is that there is an almost instantaneous response when the trigger is pulled.

    Airless Sprayers

    • Experts recommend airless sprayers for large areas of latex paint. Air pressure sprayers require a thinner paint medium, and thinning latex causes it to loose its opacity, or ability to hide, according to William McElroy, author of "Painter's Handbook." Small, inexpensive airless cup sprayers use centrifugal motion to create pressure. Professional systems designed for heavy use make use of liquid pressure to force the paint through the orifice.



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